WOOL: THE WORLD’S MOST EFFICIENT FIBER

THE MOST EFFICIENT FIBER IN THE WORLD

Numerous sheep line the green hills. You hear only their bleating and the plucking of grass. A dog guards them attentively. These are exactly the perfect conditions for our favorite renewable resource.

Sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated in Mesopotamia about 10,000 years ago. However, different societies have since attributed different values to them, and therefore they have been bred with different characteristics.

Nowadays, we can find different types of sheep and wool all over the world. This is because sheep wool, by nature, has a lot of excellent properties that synthetic fibers cannot achieve.

Wool is antibacterial, low odor, water and dirt repellent, and provides cozy warmth in winter and pleasant freshness in summer. And, of course, for excellent moisture management.

ANTIBACTERIAL AND ODORLESS

Wool is antibacterial thanks to the surface structure of wool fibers, and thus at the same time, odorless. While synthetic fibers are smooth, wool fibers have a scaly structure.

Figuratively speaking, they are reminiscent of roof tiles. For this reason, it is difficult for bacteria – and thus also unpleasant odors – to adhere to the fiber.

In addition, wool wicks moisture away quickly so that less sweat accumulates on the skin and odors do not form in the first place. The protein molecule keratin, which is contained in wool, also contributes to the odor-inhibiting effect by breaking down bacteria.

Furthermore, the fiber uses a mechanical self-cleaning process: The fiber core consists of two different types of cells that absorb different amounts of moisture and therefore swell unevenly – this creates constant friction. As a result, the fiber cleans itself over and over again.