The Art of the Finished Project

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Knitters know the excitement of walking into a yarn store, drawn in by the textures and colors. Then, you see a display of knitting needles, cases, crochet hooks, knitting magazines, and finished knitted samples. These displays are great at enticing us to start a new knitting project, but how can we stay motivated to finish the projects that we start? Let’s explore the art of the finished project.

First, it is important to choose a project that will keep us motivated and excited: something that is not too difficult, and yet it can keep our attention. Most importantly, the project must offer joy as we knit. For example, a cowl is much less of an undertaking than a sweater.  A cowl has less shaping than mittens, gloves, or socks. It can be knitted in the round with circular needles, which is perfect for meditation or car trips. 

M.G enterprise wool is ideal for knitting sweaters, art and craft, etc. Items made from this yarn may be laundered through the use of water, detergent or soap and gentle hand manipulation; no bleach product may be used.

Felting of merino occurs upon hammering or other mechanical agitation as the microscopic barbs on the surface of merino fibers hook together. Felting generally comes under two main areas, dry felting or wet felting. Wet felting occurs when water and a lubricant (especially an alkali such as soap) are applied to the wool which is then agitated until the fibers mix and bond together. Temperature shock while damp or wet accentuates the felting process. Some natural felting can occur on the animals back.

If there is an expensive yarn that you have been yearning to knit with that might be too costly for a sweater, a cowl is usually a one- or two-skein project. If you ever wanted to design a pattern, a cowl is a great project to start with.

If there is an expensive yarn that you have been yearning to knit with that might be too costly for a sweater, a cowl is usually a one- or two-skein project. If you ever wanted to design a pattern, a cowl is a great project to start with.

Instead of a cowl, you might be excited and ready to knit a sweater. I recommend bringing mindfulness to your sweater, too. Invest a little time each day as you would with your meditation practice. Break the project down into manageable pieces so you do not get overwhelmed. For example, try telling yourself, “Today, I’ll knit part of the front,” or “Today, I’ll knit the cuffs of the sleeves.” Stay on track with a few rows each day.

What should you do if there are unfinished projects that no longer hold your interest or bring you joy? Re-purpose the yarn by ripping it out and placing the yarn neatly in a basket. Allow a new project to bring that yarn to life. Release judgment, and feel excited about letting go of that unfinished project. Somehow for me, having new skeins ready for the next project feels much better. The unfinished projects are there to teach us what we don’t want, so we can pick a better project for ourselves next time.